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Sick, and want to get well? It’s possible. But are you ready to do what it takes?

What are the main aims of life, d’you think?

  • To have fun and enjoy yourself;
  • To remain as happy and healthy as possible;
  • To continue learning and growing;
  • To constantly change and evolve.

Those would be my four. And you’d probably agree, more or less.

The one that presents the most problem seems to be the last one, about change. People don’t like change. They’re afraid of it. Change is dangerous, it makes them feel like they don’t have control. So they fight it.

I’ve just returned from a week in Napa Valley, and met with several people there who were hard of hearing. When I explained my view that, in most cases, deafness doesn’t have to be permanent and can actually be healed, they were ASTONISHED. Doctors had told them that it was a by-product of aging and there was nothing they could do to get their hearing back. That’s the traditional appoach, and we just seem to buy into it. But is it true? When I gave these people a possible solution, they reeeeaaaally wanted to know. They were all ears, in fact, and went away inspired to follow my suggestions. In my experience, however, this attitude is not the usual reaction.

Only last month, a bunch of guys on my Facebook page were discussing how they’d traveled to a Scandinavian theme park and not been allowed on the rollercoaster. Seems that most of them were simply too fat to ride it; the safety harnesses wouldn’t fit around their bellies. Only one was allowed on. That’s because he’d recently had his stomach stapled. The rest of these three-hundred pounders were made to sit it out.

Feeling sorry for them, I posted a quick comment. ‘If you were to cut wheat, dairy, and sugar and all related products from your diet for six months, and replace them with real nutrients, I bet you’d lose all that weight and then you’d fit on the rollercoaster.’ A bit simplistic, and god knows I’m no nutritionist, but you get my point.

Well, the guy who’d had surgery got really angry and defensive, suggesting I was trolling his FB page with faddish dietary nonsense, and added, ‘You’re an idiot!’ (Except he wrote, ‘Your an idiot!’, which says a lot right there.)

The idea that having your stomach stapled as an alternative to simply cutting out the things that are probably making you obese was, to my mind, ludicrous. But not to him. He was outraged. Suddenly, I was a troublemaker, an idiot.

For a while I was also hurt. Now, however, I’m starting to see that this is how so many people are today. They’re not like me. If I had physical problems, or lived with major pain, or was facing the prospect of surgery, I’d make all necessary changes immediately – whatever it took to be well again. You do what it takes, right? Well, no. Apparently, that’s extremely unusual.

Just recently in Africa, a group of World Health Organization officials and journalists, who were out there teaching the locals in a remote part of Guinea about ways to prevent the ebola virus from wiping out their entire population, was attacked. Some even had their throats slit, leaving nine dead. And who committed this horrendous murder? The very people they were trying to help!

So it’s a common thread. But here’s the flaw in all of this. Back to our list again – the aims of life:

  • To have fun and enjoy yourself;
  • To remain as healthy as possible;
  • To continue learning and growing;
  • To constantly change and evolve.

If you won’t change, then that cancels out number 4. And if you’re not evolving, you’ve inevitably stopped learning  and growing, which means number 3 is out as well. It must follow, then, that you won’t be as healthy as you possibly can be, and if you’re unhealthy, how can you be happy? Where’s the fun in being sick or in pain the whole time? So that’s numbers one and two gone, too. Good grief.

One of the men in the rollercoaster group is a great person, by the way. We were good friends in college. Sadly, in the past few years he’s had a brain tumor, epilepsy, a stroke, and some form of palsy, I think, all of which he’s taken pretty stoically. Yet he weighs hundreds of pounds. He has folds on his neck like unbaked loaves. Oh, and he’s recently taken up smoking as well, in case he’s not doing enough to harm his body.

At this point, surely any sensible person would say, ‘Okay, I’m sick, I’m overweight, I’m done abusing myself; I know that fat people usually don’t live to grow to be very old. So I quit. What do I have to do to get well?” But he’s not changed one iota. Every time he posts a comment on FB it seems to be to boast about the terrible food he’s eating in vast quantities. On his last vacation, he ate more ice cream at one sitting than I have eaten in five years. It’s beyond my comprehension.

Other friends will say to me sometimes, ‘My psoriasis is so annoying,’ or ‘I can’t get rid of this acne,’ or ‘My ears ring constantly – I don’t know what it is,’ or ‘I’m going in for my third chemo tomorrow, but the cancer keeps on coming back.’ RescueTo which I will often say, ‘Wow, that’s terrible,’ followed by, ‘Actually, I think I know how you can get rid of that and heal yourself.’ Especially from hearing loss and tinnitus. I’m only a layman, a journalist, but still from my own personal experience there’s a whole bunch of stuff I know about those.

‘Ooh, how?’ they’ll say. ‘I want to be well.’

Which is true, they do – at least, up to a point.

However – and here’s the thing that amazes me more than any other – when I let slip that I’ve written a book and the answer they seek may be in there, they go, ‘Ah, okay…’ and lose interest immediately.

One friend, Julia, told me a couple of years ago that she’d just been diagnosed with diabetes. Very sad news, of course. But all is not lost. I’ve interviewed experts about this, and I honestly feel I know why she has it and what she can do to bring her body back into balance, even getting rid of her symptoms.

‘Oooh, how? Tell me,’ she said.

So I revealed the basics, and urged her to read my book.

‘Huh?’

The moment I said ‘book,’ she backed off. I have to read? Didn’t want to put any time or effort into finding out how to get well. She’d rather stay on medications and continue to have diabetes. That’s up to her, and up to everyone else who’s sick. I can’t be their savior and I’m certainly not their doctor. But jeez, guys, come on. A little bit of effort, a little bit of time – that’s all we’re talking here, and you could be well again. But already they’ve tuned out.

As a result of everything I’ve just said, I am now convinced of one thing, and it’s this: that people are wedded to their diseases. Nobody enjoys being long-term sick – that’s obvious.

Nobody likes being in chronic pain. It sucks. Everyone insists they Painwant to get well. But give them the realistic option of actually being well, and what do they do? They lose interest. They don’t want to know. They’d rather take the superficial route and have a physician prescribe pills to suppress the problem, even though pills are poisons and can cause irreparable harm to the body. But…well, it’s easier. Less effort.

Another friend, Flora, is permanently sick with a whole raft of ailments that have her in and out of hospital almost every week. The rest of us can see why she’s ill and what she could do to put her body back into alignment. We’ve even done interventions and given her ideas.

‘You’re so right,’ she says, melting. ‘I know you are. I’ll do it.’

But she never does. Why? Because, as ridiculous as it seems, she feels comfortable being unwell. Her routine is built around it. Plus, look at the amount of attention she gets, not to mention sympathy. I was rushed to hospital in an ambulance once; it was actually quite exhilarating. I felt important, a priority, which I never did in my regular life. Same with Flora. If she weren’t ill all the time, nobody would notice her. But when she’s sick, we run to her side, don’t we? Offering help, bringing gifts. That’s very reassuring.

The more sick people I meet, the more sure I become that this is almost universally true.

My best friend in the world died in February. Last year, after he’d been sick for a while with numerous ailments that nobody could explain, I threw out an idea: ‘Why not do a cleanse? Clean out your body and give it a chance to reboot.’ His response was classic: ‘I’m too lazy. If I get really ill, then I’ll do it.’ Well, he did get really ill, by which point it was too late. By the time he left us, he was in the most debilitated, tragic state imaginable. But he simply wouldn’t do anything practical to stop it. I still wish I could go back and talk to him, try harder to convince him.

There is often a way for people to find a way to wellness, but the moment they find out that it might require changing their perspective, their Too much effortpriorities, their expectations, their diet, their feelings about themselves, and so on, they zone out. Won’t do it. Subconsciously, humans cling to their state of unwellness because it’s safe. If their pain went away, what would they talk about? Who would show concern for them? The advantages of being ill are too great. And of course the medical profession exploits their weakness at every turn.

This doesn’t just apply to disease, by the way. I hear individuals complain about their life – about disputes they’re having, how they don’t get what they want, that they’re broke, frustrated, unhappy, lonely. They reveal at length how cruel life seems to be. And as they’re talking, I think, ‘My god, I know the answer to your problems! I know what you have to do to put this right.’ And so, being the lovely, helpful guy I am, I tell them.

AND THEY DON’T WANT TO KNOW!!!

That’s how crazy it is. They say they’re desperate for something better, but they cling onto the current situation out of fear of losing what little they have.

Why Your Life MattersFor example, I wrote a book that would help countless people overcome the problems in their life and  bring them back to a state of harmony, happiness, prosperity, and balance. It’s called Why Your Life Matters. All they have to do is read it, apply the principles, and everything will change for the better, beginning almost at once. Guaranteed. But will they read it? In most cases no. In fact, the people who need to read this book the most are invariably the ones who stop after the first chapter and go, ‘Not for me.’ Why? They can sense what’s coming, and they’re truly scared at a deep level of resolving their issues. Familiarity is comforting, even if it’s familiarity with something bad. At least, with the bad stuff, they know where they stand.

Look at the Middle East. Throughout my entire life there has been unrest and fighting there. The different factions may change shape and name and their weapons grow more powerful, but essentially it’s the same show in reruns. They’ve been battling each other for about three thousand years.

Three bloody thousand! War - huh.

The people of Gaza even elected a bunch of terrorists to run their government. Why would anyone then be shocked that the result is war?

Even after all the killing and destruction stretching back millennia, still nobody of any consequence goes, “Hm, you know what? This isn’t working, is it? Maybe if we tried a different approach…” Like kindness, acceptance, and forgiveness on both sides, for instance. Like putting down your mortars and grenade launchers and walking away – that sort of thing. Choose peace instead. Choose to be happy. Stop squabbling like little kids, grow up, and live a comfortable life. Above all, recognize how tiny and trivial, when set in the context of eternity and the vastness of the universe, your petty territorial conflicts are. Find the joy instead, and live from that place.

If I had Bill Gates-type clout and money, I’d see to it that copies of Why Your Life Matters were available in every hotel room, every religious and community venue, every setting across the entire region where people gather. Not the Old Testament or the Koran, none of the stuff that fuels partisanship, tribalism, or division, but a book that lays out the simple universal realities of how best to lead a good, compassionate, untroubled life without conflict. It would make a world of difference.

But it’s not going to happen, is it? They’d zone out.

You’re asking me to learn a new approach??? When I could be out there blowing shit up?’

They have weapons and grudges, and centuries of painful history to avenge. They must fight, they must score points, they must win – even though they never will and it’s plain to the rest of us that they’re wasting their time on the planet and also their precious lives.

I know this because I have people in my life who are from either Israel or the former Palestine, and they’re like wasps in a bottle – angry, restless, combative. Good souls at heart? Sure. Loyal and forthright and true. I love ’em. But oh my god, do they court trouble! Friction follows them wherever they go. So I have insights into this.

That’s why I say, people are married to their misery.

After so many friends had mentioned to me how ill they were feeling, citing a broad spectrum of ailments, from hearing loss, to allergies, to cancer, to M.S., to prostate problems, to poor memory….and so on, I took the journalistic approach and researched the subject from the ground up. And I found that there may be an answer to disease. It’s not always the insoluble mystery it seems. There might just be a way to make things right, a way that would bring their body back to harmony and wellness and improve their quality of life.

‘Oh really?’ They get excited. ‘What is it?’ Taming the Beast Within Final Cover

‘Actually, I put it in a short book called Taming the Beast Within. All you have to do is read it.’

And right there their eyes glaze over, their mind snaps shut, and…

Anyway, you get the idea. I believe I have information to help a bunch of people with their worst problems, both in life and in their body. I’ve researched this over five decades. But I can’t force anyone to hear what I have to say. Everything in this world is a choice.

Which brings me to you, I guess.

Do you prefer to stay where you are? Are you wedded to discomfort, disease, or suffering? Or are you tired of being this way and ready to embrace new possibilities? Good health is a choice, just as peace is a choice. So here they are again, the main aims of life:

  • To have fun and enjoy yourself;
  • To remain as happy and healthy as possible;
  • To continue learning and growing;
  • To constantly change and evolve.

You’re an adult. Nobody can make the decision for you. But if you want to move on and find answers, you know what you need to do.

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